ARE THESE STARS LOOKING BACK AT US? 
 ---------------------------------
 John Pazmino
 NYSkies Astronomy Inc
 nyskies@nyskies.org
 www.nyskies.org
 2002 September 27 initial
 2016 August 25 current 

    With the ongoing discovery of planets around other stars and 
increased public awareness of them, I collect here a list of the more 
showy of these planetary stars. I include the entire celestial sphere, 
recognizing the global residences and travels of NYSkies members.     
    A planetary star is a star hosting exoplanets or extrasolar 
planets. The study of planets at other stars is displacing the term 
'planetary nebula' from its use for the remanent of a nova. Such a 
nebula has nothing to do with planets. The name was invented by 
Herschel for the nebula's appearance as a ghostly planet disc. 
    'Planetary nebula' is increasingly applied to a nebula associated 
with planets at a star. The nova nebula is drifting to be called a 
'globular nebula', appropriate from its typical round shape. 
    Most of the stars hosting planets are faint and unappealing for 
home astronomers. However, a surprising number are bright enough to 
see by eye under a dark sky or in binoculars. NYSkies telescopists at 
starviewing sessions include these stars, according as their lattiude, 
date, and hour constraints, on their roster of targets.                                     
    I set out here some facts and figures for these bright planetary 
 stars. I previously limited the list to stars with Bayer or Flamsteed 
names so you can find them on binocular-level star atlases and 
planetarium softwares
    It happens that there are many planetary stars brighter than 6th 
magnitude that somehow missed having a Bayer/Flamsteed designation. 
Many of these are included here. These are likely not labeled in 
smaller star atlases. You may need a full-featured planetarium or star 
atlas software to locate them. 
    Readers from southern latitudes pointed out an extra benefit. 
Southern constellations lack a consistent Bayer/Flamsteed system. 
Their numbered stars are more likely to be Gould designations. By now 
including stars with no Bayer/Flamsteed names, I'll capture a fairer 
portion of southern planetary stars. 
    I update this article irregularly to enroll newly found bright 
planetary stars and newly discovered planets at current stars. The 
data for each planet is that near the announcement date. Addiurnate 
data is carried in the astronomy litterature as the planets are 
further studied. 
    You can spot newly found planets by their year of announcement in 
the last colmn of the table. The current edition of this article is at 

    www.nyskies.org/articles/pazmino/planstar.htm
 
    Given the ardent public interest in extrasolar planets and the 
efforts by astronomers to present news about them, I find it 
incredible that so far no major stargazing or observing reference 
offers planetary stars as a distinct category of target! About the 
most I find is a brief mention  in general text for the first few 
planetary stars. 
    One reason given for neglectingg planetary stars is that the very 
planets aren't visible. The stars look just like any other star with 
no planets. most other celestial targets for home astronomy likewise 
don't exhibit their full structure in small telescopes. Their true 
nature must be mentally imputed into telescope image. Still, deep into 
the 21st century, Still, guides for observing the sky have dense 
tables for such targets, but not for planetary stars. 
    The planetary stars are ordered by right ascension.  Within each 
star the planets are ordered by the letter, not actually listed,with 
planet 'b' first. When manipulating this table by computer, you must 
keep the planets associated with their proper stars because the star 
data are not repeated for each planet. 
    The columns 'star' thru 'spec' give the basic specs for the star 
and are essentially fixed data. The HD number comes from the Henry 
Draper catalog, a prime source for candidate planetary stars and the 
usual way to reference them. 
    SPEC is the spectral and luminosity class of the star. The 
luminosity class, ususally a Roman number, is here a decimal. For 51 
Pegasi the 'G2.4' means 'G2 IV'.
    PC is the star's distance, rounded to the whole parsec. 
    SUN is the apparent magnitude of Sun as seen from the star. This 
is (Sun app magn) = 5 * log(pc) - (0.2). This is the distance modulus 
formula with the Sun's absolute magnitude of +4.8. As an example, the 
Sun seen from 51 Pegasi (Sun at 51 Peg) = 5 * log(14.7pc) - (0.2) = 
(+5.6). 
    MJUP is the planet's mass in Jupiter units. The value is (true 
(mass)*(sin(orbit inclination)). The planet could be far more massive 
when the inclination is not known. Some references cite mass in Earth 
units. Jupiter is 318 Earth masses. 
    SMA is the semimajor axis of the planet's orbitm or mean distance 
from its central star, in AU. Do mind well that the planet may run in 
strongly excentric orbits, not closely circular ones like the planets 
of our solar system. 
    PERIOD is the planet's orbital period, its year, in Earth days. 
    YEAR is when the planet was announced. This typicly is the end of 
a many-year study of the planet to establish its properties. 
    Following the table are comments about some of the stars some 
statistics about the stars and planets. 
    This table here is still the ONE AND ONLY  consolidated source for 
bright planetary stars to show the public by eye or binoculars. Other 
lists of planetary stars for this purpose include fainto hard-to-find 
stars or are utterly ediurante with only a few earlierannounced stars. 

 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 STAR CNS HD-NUM RA--2000--DE MAG SPEC PC  SUN MJUP  SMA  PERIOD YEAR 
 ---- --- ------ ------------ --- ---- --- --- ----- ---- ------ ----
 ---  Phe    142 00 06 -49 05 5.7 G1.4 21 6.4  1.03  1     339   2001b  
  54  Psc   3651 00 39 +21 16 5.8 K0.5 11 5.0  0.2   0.28   62.2 2003 
 ---  Cet   4732 00 49 -24 08 5.0 K0.4 57 8.5  2.37  1.19  360.2 2013 
                                               2.37  4.6  2732  2013 
 ---  And   5608 00 58 +33 57 6.0 K0.4 58 8.6  1.4   1.9   792.6 2012 
 eta  Cet   6805 01 09 -10 11 3.5 K1.3 38 7.7  2.55  1.27  403.5 2014
                                               3.32  1.93  751.9 2014
 ups  And   9826 01 37 +41 25 4.1 F8.5 13 5.4  0.6   0.06   4.6  1996 
                                               1.8   0.86 237.7  1999 
                                              10.19  2.55 1302.6 1999 
   q1 Eri  10647 01 43 -53 44 5.5 F8.5 17 6.0  0.93  2.03 1003   2003 
 109  Psc  10697 01 45 +20 05 6.3 G5.4 33 7.4  6.38  2.16 1076.4 1999 
 eta2 Hyi  11977 01 55 -67 39 4.7 G8.5 67 8.9  6.54  1.93  711   2005 
 alp  Ari  12929 02 07 +23 28 2.0 K2.3 20 6.3  1.8   1.2   380.8 2011 
  75  Cet  15779 02 32 -01 07 5.4 G3.3 82 9.4  3     2.1   691.9 2012 
  79  Cet  16141 02 35 -03 34 6.8 G5.4 36 7.6  0.23  0.35   75.6 2000 
  30B Ari  16232 02 37 +24 59 7.1 F6.5 39 7.8  9.88  0.995 335.1 2009  
 lam2 For  16417 02 37 -34 35 5.8 G1.5 26 6.8  0.07  0.14   17.2 2009 
  81  Cet  16400 02 38 -03 24 5.7 G5.3 97 9.7  5.3   2.5   952.7 2008 
 iot  Hor  17051 02 43 -50 48 5.4 G0.5 16 6.0  2.26  0.93  320   1999 
  94  Cet  19994 03 13 -01 11 5.1 F8.5 22 6.5  1.68  1.42  535.7 2000 
   e  Eri  20794 03 20 -43 04 4.3 G8.5  6 3.7  0.01  0.12   18.3 2011 
                                               0.01  0.20   40.1 2011
                                               0.02  0.35   90.3 2011
 sig  Per        03 31 +48 00 4.4 K3.3103 9.9  6.5   1.8   579.8 2014
 eps  Eri  22049 03 33 -09 27 3.7 K2.5  3 2.3  1.55  3.39 2502   2000 
                                               0.1  40    9999   2003 
 eps  Ret  27442 04 17 -59 18 4.4 K2.4 18 6.1  1.35  1.16  415.2 2000b 
 eps  Tau  28305 04 29 +19 11 3.5 K0.3 45 8.1  7.6   1.93  594.9 2007 
 alp  Tau  29139 04 36 +16 30 0.9 K5.3 20 6.1  6.47  1.42  629.0 1998 
   c  Eri  29391  04 18 -02 28 5.2 F0.5 29 7.1  7.0  14.0  9999   2015 
 ---  Eri  30562 04 49 -05 40 5.8 F8.5 27 6.9  1.29  2.3  1157   2009 
 ---  Cam  33564 05 23 +79 14 5.1 F6.5 31 7.3  9.1   1.1   388   2005 
  pi  Men  39091 05 37 -80 28 5.7 G1.4 21 6.4 10.3   3.28 2049   2001 
 ---  Ori  38529 05 46 +01 10 5.9 G4.4 40 7.8  0.78  0.13   14.3 2000 
                                              17.7   3.70 2134.8 2002 
                                               0.17  0.74  193.9 2010 
 ---  Ori  38858 05 49 -04 06 6.0 G4.5 15 5.7  0.10  1.04  407.2 2011 
 bet  Pic  39060 05 47 -51 04 3.9 A6.5 19 6.2  7.0  13.2  9999   2008  
   6  Lyn  45410 06 31 +58 10 5.9 K0.4 57 8.6  2.4   2.2   899   2008 
  nu2 CMa  47205 06 37 -19 15 4.0 K1.3 20 6.3  2.6   9     763   2011 
 ---  CMa  47536 06 38 -32 20 5.3 K1.312110.2  5     1.61  430   2003  
                                               7     ---  2500   2007 
 tau  Gem  54719 07 11 +30 15 4.4 K2.3 92 9.6 20.6   1.17  306   2004 
 ---  Gem  59686 07 32 +17 05 5.5 K2.3 92 9.6  5.25  0.91  303   2003 
 ---  Pup  60532 07 34 -22 18 4.5 F6.4 26 6.8  3.15  0.77  201.8 2008 
                                               7.46  1.58  607.1 2008
 bet  Gem  62509 07 45 +28 02 1.2 K0.3 10 4.9  2.9   1.69  589.6 2006 
 ---  CMi  66141 08 02 +02 20 4.4 K2.3 81 7.4  6     1.2   480.5 2012 
 ---  Pup  69830 08 18 -45 38 6.0 K0.5 13 5.3  0.03  0.08 8667   2006 
  omi UMa  71369 08 30 +60 43 3.4 G4.2 56 8.5  4.1   3.9  1630   2012 
  pi2 UMa  73108 08 40 +64 20 4.6 K1.3 62 8.8  7.1   0.87  269.3 2007  
 rho1 Cnc  75732 08 53 +28 20 6.0 G8.5 13 5.4  0.8   0.11   14.7 1996 
                                               0.17  0.24   44.3 2001 
                                               3.84  5.76 5218   2001 
                                               0.03  0.02    0.7 2004 
                                               0.14  0.78  260.7 2007 
 ---  UMa  81688 09 29 +45 36 5.4 K0.3 89 9.5  2.7   0.81  184.0 2008 
 mu   Leo  85503 09 53 +26 00 3.9 K2.3 38 7.7  2.4   1.1    357.8 2014
 gam1 Leo  89484 10 20 +19 50 2.0 K0.3 39 7.7  8.78  1.19  428.5 2009 
 ---  UMa  89744 10 22 +41 14 5.7 F7.5 40 7.8  7.99  0.89  256.6 2000 
  24  Sex  90043 10 23 -00 54 6.4 G5.5 75 9.2  1.99  1.33  452.8 2010 
                                               0.86  2.08  883   2010 
  47  UMa  95128 10 59 +40 26 5.0 G0.5 14 5.5  2.53  2.1  1078   1996 
                                               0.54  3.6  2391   2001 
                                               1.64 11.6  9999   2010 
  83  Leo 99492  11 27 +03 00 6.5 K2.5 18 6.1  0.11  0.12   17.0 2004 
                                               0.36  5.4  4970   2010 
 ---  Cen 102365 11 47 -40 30 4.9 G2.5  9 4.6  0.05  0.46  122.1 2011 
 bet  UMi 131873 11 51 +74 09 2.1 K4.3 40 7.8  6.1   1.4   522.3 2014 
 ---  Cam 104985 12 05 +76 24 5.8 G9.3102 9.8  6.3   0.78  198.2 2003 
  11  Com 107383 12 21 +17 48 4.7 G8.311110.0 19.4   1.29  326.0 2008 
 chi  Vir 110014 12 39 -08 00 4.6 K2.3 90 9.6 11.09  2.14  835.5 2009  
  61  Vir 115617 13 18 -18 19 4.7 G5.5  9 4.5  0.02  0.05    4.2 2009 
                                               0.06  0.22   38.0 2009 
                                               0.07  0.48  123.0 2009 
  70  Vir 117176 13 28 +13 47 5.0 G4.5 22 6.5  6.6   0.48  116.7 1996 
 tau  Boo 120136 13 47 +17 27 4.5 F7.5 15 5.7  4.13  0.05    3.3 1996 
 ---  Hya 122430 14 02 -27 25 5.5 K3.313510.5  3.71  1.02  345.0 2003 
 alp2 Cen 128621 14 40 -60 50-0.2 K1.5  1 0.4  0.00  0.04    3.2 2012 
 alpC Cen ------ 14 30 -62 4111.1 M5.5  1 0.4  0.00  0.05   11.2 2016 
   8  UMi 133086 14 57 +74 54 6.8 K0.015910.8  1.5   0.49   83.4 2015 
  23  Lib 134987 15 13 -25 19 6.5 G5.5 25 6.9  1.59  0.81  258.2 1999 
                                               0.82  5.8  5000   2009 
  11  UMi 136726 15 17 +71 49 5.0 K4.312010.2 10.5   1.54  516.2 2009 
  nu2 Lup 136352 15 22 -48 19 5.7 G4.5 15 5.7  0.02  0.09   11.8 2011 
                                               0.04  0.17   27.6 2011
                                               0.03  0.41  106.7 2011 
 iot  Dra 137759 15 25 +58 58 3.3 K2.3 32 7.3  8.82  1.28  510.7 2002 
 omi  CrB 136512 15 35 +26 43 5.5 K0.3 84 9.4  1.5   0.83  187.3 2012 
 ome  Ser 141680 15 50 +02 12 5.2 G8.3 81 9.3  1.7   1.1   277.0  2013
 kap  CrB 142091 15 51 +35 39 4.8 K1.4 31 7.3  1.8   2.6  1251   2007  
 eps  CrB 143107 15 58 +26 53 4.1 K2.3 68 9.0  6.7   1.3   417.9 2012 
 rho  CrB 143761 16 01 +33 19 5.4 G0.5 17 6.0  1.05  0.22   39.8 1997 
                                               0.08  0.41  102.5 2016
  14  Her 145675 16 10 +43 49 6.6 K0.5 18 6.1  4.64  2.77 1773.4 1998 
                                               2.09  5.81  ---   2005 
 ---- Sco 147513 16 24 -39 12 5.4 G3.5 13 5.4  1     1.26  540.4 2003 
 psi1 Dra 162004 17 42 +72 09 5.7 G0.5 22 6.5  1.53  4.43 3117.0 2015 
  mu  Ara 160691 17 44 -51 50 5.2 G3.4 15 5.7  1.68  1.5   643.3 2000 
                                               0.03  0.09    9.6 2003 
                                               0.52  0.92  310.6 2004 
                                               1.81  5.24 4205.8 2006 
  nu  Oph 163917 17 59 -09 46 3.3 G9.3 47 8.2 24     1.8   530.3 2004 
                                              27     6.1  3186   2010 
  42  Dra 170693 18 26 +65 34 4.8 K1.3 97 9.7  3.88  1.19  479.1 2009 
 ---  Sgr 169830 18 28 -29 49 5.9 F8.5 36 7.6  2.88  0.81  255.6 2000 
                                               4.04  3.6  2102   2003 
 ---  Lyr 176051 18 57 +32 54 5.2 X0.0 16 5.8  1.5   1.76 1016   2010    
 eta  Tel 181286 19 23 -54 25 5.0 A0.5 48 8.1 35.0   ---   ---   2010 
  16  Cyg 186427 19 42 +50 31 6.0 G2.5 21 6.5  1.68  1.68  799.5 1996 
  xi  Aql 188310 19 54 +08 57 4.7 G9.3 63 8.8  2.8   0.68  136.8 2008 
 ---  Cyg 190360 20 04 +29 54 5.7 G6.4 16 5.8  1.50  3.92 2867.9 2003  
                                               0.06  0.13   17.2 2005 
 ---  Cap 192310 20 15 -27 02 5.7 K3.5  9 4.5  0.08  1.18  525.8 2011 
 ---  Del 196885 20 40 +11 15 6.4 F8.5 33 7.4  3.0   2.6  1326   2007 
  mu2 Oct 196067 20 42 -75 21 6.0 G0.5 44 8.0  7.1   ---  4100   2011 
  18  Del 199665 20 58 +10 50 5.5 G6.3 73 9.1 10.3   2.6   993.3 2008 
 ---  Peg 210702 22 12 +16 02 5.9 K1.3 56 8.5  1.9   1.2   354.8 2007 
 tau1 Gru 216435 22 54 -48 36 6.0 G0.5 33 7.4  1.26  2.56 1311   2002 
 rho  Ind 216437 22 55 -70 04 6.4 G4.4 27 6.9  1.82  2.32 1256   2002 
  51  Peg 217014 22 57 +20 46 5.5 G2.4 15 5.6  0.46  0.05    4.2 1995 
 alp  PsA 216956 22 58 -29 37 1.2 A3.5  8 4.2  2   115    9999   2008  
 ---  Peg 218396 23 07 +21 08 6.0 A5.5 39 7.8  7    68    9999   2008 
                                              10    38    9999   2008 
                                              10    24    9999   2008 
                                               9    14.5  9999   2010 
 ---- Cas 219134 23 13 +27 10 5.6 K3.5  7 4.0  0.01  0.04    3.1 2015 
                                               0.04  0.06    6.8 2015 
                                               0.07  0.26   46.7 2015 
                                               0.01  2.56 1842.0 2015 
                                               0.0   0.15   22.8 2015 
                                              0.03   0.38    94.2 2015 
                                              0.38   3.06 2198.0 2015 
 psi1 Aqr 219449 23 16 -09 05 4.2 K0.3 46 8.1  3.32  0.7   181.4 2003 
  14  And 221345 23 31 +39 14 5.2 K0.3 76 9.2  5.33  0.83  185.8 2008 
 gam  Cep 222404 23 39 +77 38 3.2 K2.5 14 5.5  1.85  2.05  903.3 2002 
 kap  And 222439 23 41 +44 20 4.2 B9.4 52 8.4 44.0  55     ---   2013 
 ------------------------------------------------------------------

    HD142 Phoenicis is about 1/2 between eps aPhe nd pi Phe and ~1 deg 
W of tau Phe. Other names: TYC8025-341-1, SAO214963, PPM304555, CD-
49:14337, HR6, CPD-49:11858 
    54 Piscium is the southwestern star of the pair 54 & 55 Psc 
    HD4732 Cet is 1/2 beteeen bet Cet (Diphda) and alp Scl. The W side
of a triangle between it and bet Cet points to it.  
    HD5806 Andromedae is 2/3 from del And to bet And. Other names: 
SAO54306, TYC2285-553-1, HR275, PPM65815, BD+33:0140. 
    upsilon Andromedae in 1999 was found to have two more planets, the 
first other star with a true 'solar system'. In 2010 the orbits of the 
two 1999 planets were found to be about 30 degrees inclined from each 
other, making ups And the first instance of a planetary system with so 
steeply dispersed orbit planes. ups And is sometimes mistaken for eps 
And, an other star. 
    q1 Eridani is the western of a pair with q2 Eri, about 4 deg N of 
alp Eri (Achernar). 
    109 Piscium is sometimes misnamed as 106 Psc, nu Psc, a wrong 
star. 109 sits about 1 deg ESE from 107 Psc and is easiest approached 
from downtown Aries. 
    alpha Arietis (Hamal) is in downtown Aries with bet & and gam Ari. 
    79 Ceti is not labeled in many charts. It is about 1/2 deg W of 81 
Cet, between omi Cet (Mira) and Caput Ceti. 81 Cet is an other 
planetary star in this table, maing the 79 & 81 Cet the closest 
angular spacing between planetary stars. Linearly 79 Cet is about 22LY 
closer than 81 Cet. 
    30B Arietis is 1/2 between alp Ari (Hamal) and the Pleiades. The A 
star is HD16246. The magnitude of the pair is 6.2. 
    81 Ceti is the brighter and eastern of the pair 79 & 81 Ceti.  it 
is usually labeled, while 79 Cet, an other planetary star in this 
table, is not. They are only 1/2 degree apart, the closest angular 
spacing between planetary stars. They are linearly well separated, 81 
Cet being about 221LY farther away than 79 Cet. 
    e Eridani is about 5 deg SE of the Eri. 
    sigma Persei is a perspective or alignment double str, not a true 
binary. The line-of-sight companion has no attachment to it. Some 
authors mistakenly call this star 'sigma A' as the primary member of a 
binary system. 
    epsilon Eridani was, with tau Ceti, the first serious candidates 
in the 1960s for extraterrestrial intelligence. The second planet is 
uncertain, with a period of 102,270 days, about 280 years. The 
'9999' in the table is an overflow. The inner planet rounded its 
periastron during 2007, when it could have been opticly imaged. As at 
issue date no such iamge was obtained. Fomalhaut, alp PsA, in 2008 
became the first star to have its planet opticly photographed. Star 
HR8799 has the first planet ever imaged, in the infrared band, earlier 
in 2008. 
    epsilon Tauri (Ain) is at the end of the northern 'horn' of the 
Hyades. Of the planetary stars in this table it is the only one as a 
member of a star cluster. 
    alpha Tauri (Aldebaran) is in front of the Hyades at 20pc distance 
but itcompletes the cluster's 'V'' shaoe. The planet was first 
reported in 1998, then held in 'unconfirmed' status due to erratic 
radial velocity measurements. In 2015 it was offered again with more 
convincing data. Aldebaran's oscillations as a pulsating giant star 
confused the observations. 
    c Eridani, also 51 Eri, is W of mu Rri and N of nu Eri, making a 
eight triangle with them. 
    HD30562 Eridani is 4 deg S of mu Eri and 2 deg W of ome Eri. Other 
names: HR1536, TYC4748-1630-1, SAO131504, PPM187358, BD-5:1044 
    HD33564 Camelopardalis is in an empty part of sky with no 
convenient star-hop to it. It is roughly 2/5 from alp UMi (Polaris) 
and alp Cam. Other names: TYC4532-2096-1, PPM5936, BD+79:169, SAO5496, 
HR1686 
    HD38529 Orionis is about 2/5 from zet Ori (Anilam) to alp Ori 
(Betelgeuse) and is the obvious star betwwn 51 & 56 Ori. Other names: 
HR1988, TYC116-1316-1, PPM149432, BD+1:1126, SAO113119 
    HD38858 Orionis is 1/3 from kap Ori (Saiph) to alp Ori 
(Betelgeuse) and is the east one of the pair at this spot. Other 
names: TYC4776-1306-1, PPM188472, BD-4:1244, HR1007, SAO132554 
    beta Pictoris was long known to have a dust disc that could hide a 
planet. The planet was imaged with the VLT in near infrared. By 2010 
continued imaging showed motion of the planet thru about 1/2 of its 
orbit. Thr otbt period is 13,268 days, the '9999' in the table being 
overflow. 
     6 Lyncis is in an empty part of sky with few other attractions. 
It now is an interesting waypoint between Auriga and Ursa Major. 
    HD47536 Canis Majoris is about 2/5 from kap CMa to zet CMa and 1/2    
between lam CMa and kap CMa. Other nanmes: SAO197019, CD-32:3216, 
TYC7091-1257-1, PPM282919, CPD-32:01260, HR2447, SAO197019 
    tau Geminorum's planet was announced in 2004 but confirmed in 2010 
    HD59686 Geminorum is about 1/2 from bet CMi (Gomeisa) to bet Gem 
(Pollux), about 5 deg E of kap Gem, about 2 deg N of 68 Gem. Other 
names: TYC1364-1582-1, PPM124127, HR2877, SAO96985 , BD+17:1596 
    HD60532 Puppis is anout 2/5 from rho Pup to alp CMa. Other names: 
SAO174009, HR2906, TYC5991-217-1, PPM252677, BD-21:2007 
    beta Geminorum (Pollux) marks the head of the southern twin. The 
planet runs in a nearly circular orbit, e = 0.02, It was suspected 
since 1993 but confirmed in July 2006. 
    HD66141 Canis Minoris is 1/2 from alp CMi (Procyon) to 1 & 2 
Hya and 1 deg E of 14 CMi. Other names: BD+02:154, PPM153760, HR3145, 
SAO116260, TYC198-2137-1. 
    HD69830 Puppis is about 2/5 from 22 Pup to 19 Pup, a bit N of that 
line, the only obvious star at this point. Other names: HR3259, BD-
12:2449, PPM219933, SAO154093, TYC5435-2991-1. 
    omicron Ursae Majoris (Muscida) is the brightest star in Ursa 
Major outside of the Big Dipper. It stands out in the empty region 
between Big Dipper and Gemini & Auriga. 
    pi2 Ursae Majoris, 4 Ursae Majoris, is the southeastern of an arc 
of three stars: 2 UMa, pi1 UMa, pi2 UMa.  
    rho1 Cancri is also 55 Cancri. The Bayer letters are a bit 
inconsistent among authors in this part of Cancer. rho1 (55) is the 
northeastern one of the pair 53 and 55. The planet found in 2004 has 
semimajor axis of 0.038 AU, or 5.68 million kilometers. The table 
value is rounded.  
    gaama1 Leonis (Algieba) is one of the more showy double stars. The 
primary is the planetary star. 
    HD81688 Ursae Majoris is 2/5 from kap UMato lam UMa. Other catalog 
names: SAO42876, TYC3425-1596-1, PPM51268, BD+46:1509, HR3743, 
    HD89744 Ursae Majoris is 1/2 deg S of mu UMa (Tania Australis). 
Other names: SAO43309, HR4067, TYC3004-578-1, PPM51848, BD+41:2076 
    24 Sextantis is not labeled in many charts. It's about 2 deg W of 
bet Sex. A star of similar brightness is halfway between the two. The 
two planets are in a 2:1 period resonance, the 1st example in this 
table of orbit resonance beyond our solar system. 
    47 Ursae Majoris passes almost thru the zenith of New York City. 
The second planet is still uncertain. The third planet's period is 
14,002 day; the '9999' entry is an overflow.
    83 Leonis is often not labeled on charts. It sits 1/2 deg NW of 
tau Leo as the firt in an arc of several stars extnding NW. It is a 
binary with the planets at the B member, of magnitude 7.4. The primary 
83A Leo is HD99491, magn 6.5, about the total brightness of the pair. 
Other names for the B star: BD+03:2503, SAO118865, TYC267-3200-1, 
PPM157866. 
    HD102365 Centauri is ~1-1/2 from eps Cen thru gam Cen, and once 
from bet Cru thru del Cen. Other names: TYC7745-1381-1,CD-39: 07301, 
CPD-39:05265, SAO223020, HR4523 
    HD104985 Camelopardalis is ~2/5 from kap Dra to alp UMi and ~3 
times beyond gam (Pherkad) to bet (Kochab) UMi. It is the southern  of 
a pair of stars. Other names: TYC4550-2113-1, PPM8082, BD+77:461 
HR4609, SAO7500 
    61 Virginis is 1/2 between alp Vir (Spica) and gam Hya. Its 
planets are superearths. Planet b is 5.1 Earth mass: c, 18.2; d, 22.9. 
    HD122430 Hydrae is ~1 deg SW of pi Hya. Other catalog names: 
SAO182182, TYC-6737-83-1, PPM262401, CD-26:10060, CPD-26:5147, HR5265 
    alpha2 Centauri (Toliman) is the dimmer component in the main 
alp1-alp2 binary and hosts the 2012 planet.  The HD number is for 
alp2. alp1 is HD128620. The listed magnitude is for the pair. alp2 is 
magn +1.3. The planet mass is 0.0036 Jupiter, 1.14 Earth. The table 
figure is an underflow. In 2016 a planet was announced at the third 
member of the system, alphaC, described under its own entry. alpha 
Centauri is the first star with planets at more than one member of its 
system. 
    alphaC Centauri (Proxima) is the third member of the alpha 
Centauri system and hosts its own planet, announced in 2016. proxima 
is a red dwarf, 11th magn, often overlooked against its prominent A-B 
companions. The listed mass is an under low. Its mass is 0.004 
Jupiter, 1.14 Earth. Because Proxima is on the front side of its orbit 
around the A-B pair, it is the closest planetary star known, by about 
one light-month. alpha2, or alphaB, has a planet from 2012 detailed 
under its own entry. The alpha Centauri system is the first planetary 
star with planets at different members. 
    8 Ursae Minoris is usually not labeled, being a fainter Flamsteed 
star. It is in a close pair 1/5 from bet UMi to the UMI and at the 
right angle of triangle with bet UMi and 5 Umi. Of the two stars 
 8 UMi is the star nearer to the or the outer one in the bet-5 
triangle. 
    11 Ursae Minoris is ~1/2 deg W of gam UMi (Pherkad). 
    14 Herculis is not labeled in many charts. It is about one deg SE 
from phi Her. Its second planet, reported in 2005, is still uncertain. 
    HD147513 Scorpii is ~1/2 from eta Lup to mu2 Sco. Other names: 
HR6094, SAO207622, TYC7853-621-1, PPM295007,CD-38:10983, CPD-38:06407 
    psi1 Draconus is a triple star with the planet at member B. The  A 
member is HD162003 and the ttotal magnitude of the system is 4.6. 
    nu Ophiuchi's first planet was announced in 2005 but confirmed in 
2010. The second planet was announced in 2010. 
    HD169830 Sagittarii is ~1/2 from lam Sgr to eps Sgr and 2 deg E of 
del Sgr. Other catalog names: TYC6869-1277-1, CD-29:14965, CPD-
29:5565,  PPM268436, HR6907, SAO186838 
    HD176501 Lyrae is 1 deg NW of gam Lyr and is the first non-
Bayer/Flamsteed star in this table. Star is a binary but the which 
component has the planet is uncertain. The spectral class is a 
placeholder until further data is known. Other names: PPM82082, 
SAO67612, BD+32:3267, TYC2643-3345-1, HR7162 
    16 Cygni is occasionally mixed up with 61 Cygni, the first star 
whose remoteness was certainly measured. 16 is near the Cyg, the 
western wing of the swan. 61 is near sig & tau Cyg, in the eastern 
wing. The planet is at the B compnonet of this binary star. 
    xi Aquilae, also spelled ksi Aquilae, is 1/5 from alp Aql (Altair) 
to bet Aql (Alshain). 
    HD190360 Cygni is about 1/2 from eps  Cyg to bet (Albireo) Cyg. 
Other names: TYC2153-2883-1, PPM110318, BD+29:3872, SAO88133, HR7670 
    HD192310 Capricorni is 2/3 from ome Cap to ome Sgr, the only 
obvious star at this spot. Other names: HR7722, CD-27:14659, 
PPM270900, SAO189065, TYC6914-1943-1. A previously planet, b, was 
retracted, leaving onlythe present one, c. 
    HD196885 Delphini is about 1/2  deg ESE of iot Del and is a binary 
star. The A component has the planet. Other names: HR7907, SAO106360,
TYC1092-1778-1, PPM138799, BD+10:4351
    18 Delphini is 1/2 between alp Equ and alp Del. gam  Equ and del 
Equ, prolonged westward, aim almost directly at it. 
    HD210702 Pegasi is ~1/2 between eps and lam Peg and ~1/2 between 
xi and 9 Oeg. Other names: TYC1681-1751-1, SAO107729, HR8461, 
PPM141171, BD+15:4592 
   51 Pegasi is THE FIRST BRIGHT PLANETARY STAR, one with a Bayer or 
Flamsteed designation. Planetary stars before 51 Peg were beyond easy 
reach of binoculars. 
    HD219134 Cassiopeiae is about 1/2 between del Cep and rho Cas, the 
brightest among the few stars at this spot. Its seven planets, all 
found within 2015, is the largest planet system in this table. It has 
proper motion of about 2 arcsec/yer, detectable by  comparing large-
scaleimages a few yers apart. Planet b may be a rocky world, the 
closest to our solar system. Other names: BD+56:2966, HR8832, TYC4006-
1866-1, SAO35236, PPM41159. 
    alpha Piscis Austrini (Fomelhaut) has a dust disc known since 
1998. The planet was found by HST imaging and is THE FIRST PLANET TO 
BE OPTICLY DETECTED. The period is 872 year. '9999' in the table is an 
 overflow. The planet is the least luminous object ever found outside 
the solar system. Star HD218396 Pegasi had its planet imaged in 
infrared wavelength a few months earlier.
    HD218396 Pegasi is 4/10 from alp Peg to bet Peg and 2 deg E of 51 
Peg. Its three 2008 planets were THE FIRST PLANETS EVER PHOTOGRAPHED, 
in near infrared by Keck Obsy in Sep 2008. This feat was followed 
later in 2008 by imaging the alpha Piscis Austrini planet with HST in 
the optical band. The periods are overflows. Planet b is 170,000 days; 
c, 69,000; d, 36,500; e, 18,000. Other names: BD+20:5278, HR8799, 
PPM115157, SAO91022, TYC1718-2350-1. 
    psi1 Aquarii , or 91 Aqur,a is the western of three stars with 
psi2 and psi3 Aqr. 
    gamma Cephei's planet was announced in 2002. Some sources say 
2003, a typo,  
    kappa Andromedae is in the Gloria Frederica asterism with iot, 
lam, and psi And. 
 --------------------------------------------------------------------
    I gather a few statistics about the stars and planets.These data 
cover ONLY the entries here, in this table, not all of the known 
planetary stars. 

    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    PLANETARY STARS 
    ---------------
    item                 | star         | year | value 
    ---------------------+--------------+------+------ 
    total stars          | 97 stars     | 2016 | with 138 planets 
    first member in list | 51 Peg       | 1995 | 1st Flamsteed/Bayer 
    first 2-planet star  | ups And      | 1999 | with 3rd planet 
    first 3-planet star  | ups And      | 1999 | with 2nd planet 
    first 4-planet star  | rho1 Cnc     | 2004 | 
    first 5-planet star  | rho1 Cnc     | 2007 | 
    first 6-planet star  | HD219134 Cas | 2015 | with 7th planet
    first 7-planet star  | HD219134 Cas | 2015 | with 6th planet 
    brightest star       | alp Cen      | 2012 | magn -0.1, both A & B 
    dimmest star         | alp Cen C    | 2016 | magn +11.1 
    farthest star        |8 UMi         | 2015 | 159 parsec 
    nearest star         | alp Cen C    | 2016 | 1.2 parsec 
    most northern star   | gam Cep      | 2007 | decl +77d 38m 
    most southern star   | pi Men       | 2001 | decl -80d 28m 
   ------------------------------------------------------
    PLANETS                                              
    -------
    item                 | planet        | year | value 
    ---------------------+---------------+------+------ 
    total planets        | 138 planets   | 2016 | at 97 stars 
    multipicity          | 1.4227        | 2016 | (planets)/(stars) 
    first imaged planet  | alp PsA b     | 2008 | optical 
                         | HD218693 Peg  | 2008 | b-c-d, near IR 
    most massive planet  | HD38529 Ori c | 2002 | 17.7 Jupiter 
    least massive planet | alp2 Cen b    | 2012 | 1.14 Earth 
    farthest from star   | alp PsA b     | 2009 | 115 AU 
    closest to star      | 55 Cnc d      | 2004 | 0.01 AU 
    longest orbit period | alp PsA b     | 2009 | 872 years 
    shortest period      | 55 Cnc d      | 2004 | 2.8 days 
 ---------------------------------------------------------

    Yes, it is impossible for home telescopes to reveal the planets. 
Yet it is enchanting to point out their host stars to your visitors. 
While these stars look entirely ordinary, they hold the prospect that 
in their planets there could be people looking back at us!